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Ayahuasca: alkaloids, plants & analogs
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Section 2 :
Ayahuasca-Caapi-Yajé: Common names

An overview and incomplete listing of common names and `varieties' of the plant and/or drink, usages and identities of the terms, similar words referring to other plants and some associated terms.


Admixture plants can be found in a separate listing of common names later in this work.

ayahuasca (ayawaska, hayawaska, etc.)
Used as common names for the Malpighiaceous Banisteriopsis caapi, Banisteriopsis inebrians, Banisteriopsis quitensis, Banisteriopsis muricata, and Banisteriopsis longialata as well as the Solanaceous Juanulloa ochracea and the Violaceous Rinorea viridiflora
caapi (capi, cabi etc..)
Used as common names for the Malpighiaceous Banisteriopsis caapi, Banisteriopsis inebrians, Cabi paraensis and Tetrapteris methystica and, curiously, the Morning-glories, Ipomoea denticulata and Ipomoea tiliacea.
yagé (yagê, yahe, yajé etc...)
Used as common names for the Malpighiaceous Banisteriopsis caapi, Banisteriopsis elegans, Banisteriopsis inebrians, Banisteriopsis Martiniana var. laevis, Diplopterys cabrerana and Tetrapteris mucronata, the Leguminous Calliandra calothyris and Leucana guatemalensis [In Mexico; Leucana confusa is known as Huaje and Guaje colorado and Leucana macrophylla as Guaje.], and the Rubiaceous Psychotria alba, Psychotria carthaginensis, Psychotria marginata, Psychotria stenostachya and Psychotria viridis.


The two most commonly used source plants for ayahuasca:

Banisteriopsis caapi
Variously known as amarón wáska (amarrón huasca), ambiwáska, ayahuasca (ayawáska), bejuco, bejuco de boa, biaj, biáxa, bichemia, caapi, hapataino', iñotaino', name, natém, nepe, nepi, oo'-na'oo, rami appane, rami wetseni, reé-ma, sacawáska, yagé, yajé, yaxé, yehé-ñoxkã-dá and MANY other names. Alkaloid content appears to be highly variable.

&

Banisteriopsis inebrians+
Reported with the additional names of batahua, batsikawa, bejuco de oro, he-kahi-ma, kahi-ukó, kumua-basere-kahi-ma, oo-fá and suari-tukuro-kahi-ma.

For most intents and purposes ayahuasca, caapi and yagé are synonymous although the actual composition of the drink may vary substantially from one area, or even practitioner, to the next.

Native practitioners recognize far more "species" and "varieties" within taxonomically defined species than do botanists. Work to study their delineations (especially with regards to their chemistry) is greatly needed as is propagation of vouched and verifiable germplasm. Some of the recognized types are vegetative forms collected from the same plants; differential occurrence of alkaloids would not be a surprise but, thus far, no work has been done in this area.

Schultes 1972c mentioned a 1972 letter from S. Hugh-Jones as listing 29 named varieties of yagé that were recognized by the Barasana of the Rio Piraparana in Colombia. A letter from 1971 had reported 10 recognized varieties of which 8 had (sterile) voucher material submitted. Schultes 1972c also mentioned a 1972 letter from E.J. Langdon as listing 17 classes of yagé recognized by Siona of Colombian Putumayo.

The Peruvian Matsigenka use wild B. caapi and other local species but they consider these inferior and dangerous in comparison to their normal sources.

They normally use six or more cultivated varieties of B. caapi. Each is believed to have its own specific uses and effects. Shepard 1998

The drink is believed to be used by over 70 tribes (Luna 1986b tabulated 72); Luna also collected over 40 names for it. See Ott 1994 Ayahuasca Analogues (and references) therein for an excellent summary and review of work past and present.

Ayahuasca (Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia), Caapi (Brazil and Colombia), Yajé (Colombia) are the names most commonly used.

Plant and/or drink is variously known (or spelled) as Ayahuesca, Ayawasca, Cabi, Dapa, Hayawasca, Huanto, Iyona, Ka-heé, Kahi, Kalí, Kamalampi, Mihi, Mii, Natem, Natema, Nepi, Nepe, Nixi pae, Oo-fá, Pilde, Pinde, Piturijacu, Pucahuasca, Rambi, Reé-ma, Shuri, Tsipu, Tukondi, Undi, Yagé, Yagê, Yahe, Yajén and many others. These names may be ill-defined or differently applied depending on the region of use. Yagé and yajé are often used to refer to entirely different plants. Bristol 1966a, Ducke 1957, Costa 1956 citing Reinberg 1921, Der Marderosian et al. 1969, Poisson 1965, McKenna et al. 1984, Schultes 1957, Schultes 1975b, Schultes 1978, Schultes 1985.

Gates 1982 gives the following local names for B. caapi (and synonyms):


Brazil:

Caapi, Cauupuri mariri, Mão de onça, Tiwaco-mariri and Yagé.

Colombia:
Ayahuasca, Yagé, Yagé del monte and Yagé sembrado.

Ecuador:
Ayahuasca, Natema, Nepe

Peru: Ayahuasca, Ayahuasca amarilla, Ayahuasca negra, Cielo ayahuasca, Cuchi-ayahuasca, Purga-huasca, Purga-huasca de los perros, Shuri-fisopa.


Some words below are simply alternate orthographic renderings of identical words; they were left as given by the source.

(See our references for more details):

? iko:
Siona word for ayahuasca; signifying remedy. Luna 1986b. Siona name for both plant and the drink (particularly when speaking in Spanish). Also used to refer to nonhallucinogenic medicinal and comforting preparations. Generic terms for `medicine'. Langdon 1986

agahuasca: Common name given on an herbarium voucher of Banisteriopsis muricata (Cav.) Cuatr. (Peru). Bristol 1966

agüita: Word meaning "herb tea". Williams 1987

agüita de la soga: See totsha cuyo

`aíro yahé: "forest Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). `forest' indicates a "wild" variety. Vickers & Plowman 1984

ala de zompopo: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in El Salvador) for Banisteriopsis muricata

amarón wáska: A Sibundoy word for B. caapi. (amarrón: Spanish for "boa" and wáskha: Quichua for "cord" (i.e. liana) Bristol 1966

amarrón chagrupanga: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. rusbyana Bristol 1966 Diplopterys cabrerana? See comment in ayahuasca admixture common name list.

amarrón huasca: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

ambihuasca: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

ambi-huasca: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

ambiwáska: A Sibundoy term for B. caapi and the drug prepared from it. (derived from Quichua) Bristol 1966

aso-yajé: "yajé de mono negro lanoso" "black woolly monkey yaje" Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986.

Auca: A name sometimes used to refer to the Waorani in eastern Ecuador. Term of Quichua origin implying "savage". Davis & Yost 1983b

auca ayahuasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis schunkei B.Gates, sp. nov. (Apparently not reported to be used in ayahuasca.)

aya: Quechua word meaning a person's soul or the spirit of the dead. Luna 1986b

ayahoasca: Spelling for the name of the drink; encountered in Pomilio et al. 1999

aya-huasca:
Common name given on herbarium vouchers of Banisteriopsis muricata (Cav.) Cuatr. (Peru). Bristol 1966

ayahuasca: Often, but not always, representing B. caapi or B. inebrians. A Quichua derived word often translated as "vine of the Soul"; more literally translated as the "death vine" or "vine of the dead". See under ayawáska. Name used in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia and the name south of Rio Caquetá in Colombia (according to Whiffen). Indians of Rios Napo, Rio Curaray, Rio Bobonaza and Rio Pastaza. Schultes 1957. Name used for both the plant and drink among the Záparo, Angatero, Mazán and other tribes of the upper Río Napo in Amazonian Ecuador. Schultes 1957 and Schultes 1978 cited Villavicencio 1858. Also used by the Záparo in the north eastern Peruvian Andes. Herbarium collections of Banisteriopsis inebrians from Mocoa in Amazonian Colombia were annotated with this name; Schultes 1957. Name used for both the vine and the drink by Mestizos in Peru. Two types are recognized by the Mestizos and by some Indian groups: ayahuasca negro (Black) and ayahuasca blanco (White). Rivier & Lindgren 1972.

Pinkley 1969 noted that while all tribes in Ecuador know and use the Quichua term ayahuasca with others, they also have their own word(s) for the drink and source plant.

ayahuasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Colombia, Ecuador and Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

ayahuasca: Name occasionally applied to Banisteriopsis longialata (Ndz.) B.Gates (said to sometimes be used as source plant) Duke & Vasquez Martinez 1993. Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis muricata

ayahuasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis muricata

ayahuasca: Name used for the Solanaceous Juanulloa ochracea Cuatr. in the Colombian Putumayo. Bianchi & Samorini 1993 cited Schultes 1967a.

ayahuasca: Name used for the Violaceous Rinorea viridiflora Rusby by the Siona-Secoya. Bianchi & Samorini 1993 citing Schultes & Raffauf 1990.

ayahuasca amarilla: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

ayahuasca de los brujos: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis muricata

ayahuasca negra: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

ayahuasca negro: Diplopterys involuta(Turcz.) Niedenzu [= Mezia includens] [Malpighiaceae]. Ott 1994 and Schultes 1983c. See in admixture common name list.

ayahuasca roja: "Red ayahuasca" An ayahuasca recognized and used by the Shibipo on the upper and middle Ucayali and town dewellers in Iquitos. It was thought to probably be Banisteriopsis caapi. Analysis enabled the isolation of 0.37% total alkaloid; of which the bulk was harmine with the additional presence of what was suspected to be harmaline. Urzúa et al. 1972

ayahuasca rosada: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis muricata

ayahuasca sacha: Name used in Tocache for Banisteriopsis muricata Cav. [Malpighiaceae]. Duke & Vasquez Martinez 1993

ayawasca: An herbarium voucher consisting of Banisteriopsis quitensis (Ndz.) Morton samaras mixed with the leaves of Mascagnia psilophylla (Juss.) Griseb. var. antifebrilis (Ruiz & Pav.) Ndz. (leaves) was labeled as hayawasca or ayawasca. Pieces of liana were said to be boiled. Schultes 1957 and Schultes 1986a. Other specimens of B. quitensis also exist that are labeled ayawasca and identified as sources of a narcotic drink. There are additional reports of its use in Amazonian Peru. Schultes 1957.

ayawáska: A Sibundoy term for B. caapi and the drink prepared from it. (derived from Quichua; áya: "cadaver" and wáskha: "liana") Bristol 1966

bee-ra-ree-a-ma: Name used for Tetrapteris styloptera [Tetrapteris methystica] by Colombian Makuna. Schultes 1975a

bejuco: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

bejuco colorado: Common name in Colombia for Banisteriopsis heterostyla (Adr. Jussieu) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982 Not reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation.

bejuco de boa: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

bejuco de casa: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in El Salvador) for Banisteriopsis muricata

bejuco de oro: ("golden vine") Herbarium collections of Banisteriopsis inebrians from Mocoa in Amazonian Colombia were annotated with this name. Schultes 1957

bejuco de yagé: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

bejuco golandrina: Common name in Colombia for Banisteriopsis heterostyla (Adr. Jussieu) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982 Not reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation.

bejuco hoja de plata: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Bolivia) for Banisteriopsis muricata

bejuco solar: "Solar's vine" Popular name in Colombia for yagé. Ramírez de Jara 1986

brew (The brew): A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

biaj: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Sibundoy Valley, Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

bi'ã yahé: "bird Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). Name is said to refer to it bearing small leaves. [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

bi'-a'-yajé: "yajé de pájaro" "bird yaje" Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

biáxa: A Sibundoy term for B. caapi. Sometimes refers to other climbing plants. (derived from Kamsá) Bristol 1966

biaxíi : A Sibundoy term for the drink prepared from B. caapi. (derived from Kamsá) [pronounced byah-hee-ee] A brew prepared from the leaves of B. rusbyana (D. cabrerana) and the bark of B. caapi stem. Bristol 1966

bicémia : A Sibundoy term for B. caapi. (derived from Kamsá) Bristol 1966 "c" has v-shaped diacritical mark over it.

bichemia:
Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected near Mocoa-Pepino, Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

bird yaje: See bi'-a'-yajé

black cat-fish yaje: See zi-simi-yajé

black woolly monkey yajé: See aso-yajé

boxká-dá : (vine of the forest, of which there are two kinds) Unidentified vine, the bark indicated by Brüzzi as used for a caapi source among the Tukano of the Brazilian Rio Vaupés. (Schultes thinks it probably represents growth stages of B. caapi) Schultes 1972a cited Brüzzi 1962.

caapi : Name used in Brazil for Banisteriopsis plant and drink; cultivation and use by Tukanoan Indians of the Rio Uaupés was reported by Spruce in 1852. Schultes observed it used among the same people on of the Rio Tikié, an affluent of the Rio Uaupés. The name north of Rio Caquetá in Colombia according to Whiffen. Name used by the Guahibo of the upper Orinoco in Colombia and Venezuela. Also used on the Rio Negro in Brazil. Schultes 1957. Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for B. caapi [or synonym].
Also as caapí in Rätsch 1998.

caapi: Name used (by Makú ) in region of Brazilian-Colombian boundary for Tetrapteris methystica and drink prepared from it. Bark is used as cold-water infusion. Schultes 1975a and Schultes 1986.

caapi: Name used in Dominica for Ipomoea denticulata and Ipomoea tiliacea. Von Reis Altschul 1975

caapi contenida en la instrumento juruparí: See wenan-duri-guda-hubea-ma

caapi de cabeza de animal de caza: See wai-buku-lihoa-ma

caapi de jaguar rojo: See yaiya-suava-kahi-ma

caapi del agua: See kahi-uko

caapi of the head of the monkey: See cají-vaíbucura-rijoma

caapi of the red jaguar: See yaíya-suána-cají-má

caapi para el chaminismo: See kumua-basere

caapi-piníma: (Painted caapi; Caapi of color) is an unidentified admixture plant; Schultes 1973 and 1978. Name used for a drink used by Makú of the Rio Tiquie in Brazil. Luna 1986b. Schultes proposed it may represent Tetrapterys methystica but this saw neither subsequent investigation nor proof. See discussion elsewhere and entry under admixture common name list.

caapueira: A name used in Brazil for Cabi paraensis. Ducke 1957

cabí: Name used in Brazil for Cabi paraensis and less commonly for B. caapi. Ducke 1957, de Siqueira-Jaccoud 1959, Von Reis Altschul 1975.

cadána: Name used for ayahuasca by the Tukanos of the Vaupés. Luna 1986b

cadána-píra: Name used for ayahuasca by the Tukanos of the Vaupés. Luna 1986b

cajé-uco: Tukano name for Diplopterys cabrerana. Schultes 1986a Used as a DMT containing admixture.caji: Yaje as known by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. They recognize 6 classes. Schultes 1986a Name used among Yebasama. Thought to refer to ayahuasca but the source was unclear exactly what plant(s) was employed. Luna 1986b

cají: Name for Banisteriopsis lucida in Venezuela. Ott 1994

caji-idirecaji: Name used for ayahuasca by the Makuna and Yecuana. Luna 1986b

cají-somomá: "Remedy of Caapi" Caapi that causes vomiting. Also known as cají-uco. Tucano name suggests this to be D. cabrerana. Schultes 1986a cited Deltgen 1978-1979.

cají-vaíbucura-rijoma: "Caapi de la cabeza de mono" "Caapi of the head of the monkey" Causes visions of Howler monkeys. (Thought to correspond to B. caapi.) 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a cited Deltgen 1978-1979.

cajúuri-cají-má: Weakest of the cajís that are used for hallucinations. It only helps méné-cají-má but does not produce effects on its own. (Thought to correspond to B. caapi.) 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a cited Deltgen 1978-1979.

calawaya: A common name (Shipibo) given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

camárambi: A common name (Piro) given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

camaramti: A common name given for ayahuasca (Shipibo) by Rätsch 1998.

carapë nihi: Name used for Banisteriopsis muricata (Cav.) Cuatr. [Malpighiaceae] by the Chácobo living at Alto Ivón, Beni, Bolivia. [Common in their area but they do not use it.]

caupurí: Large noded form of Banisteriopsis vine from Amazonia. Stronger effects and side effects. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

cauupuri mariri: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for B. caapi [or synonym]. Name for ayahuasca used in Brazil. Luna 1986b

cha: Name for Ayahuasca tea used by UdV. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

chagro-panga: Name used for B. longialata; Schultes 1957.

chahua: A common name given for ayahuasca (Shipibo) in Rätsch 1998.

chinak: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Venezuela) for Banisteriopsis martiniana var. martiniana (This variety has evidently not been reported in ayahuasca?)

cibo: Yecuana name for ayahuasca (a general name used for vining plants) Luna 1986b See also cipó.

cielo ayahuasca : Name used for a Peruvian ayahuasca cultivar. One clone collected near Tarapoto, Peru that was analyzed tested stronger than another B. caapi clone known by the same name collected near Tarapoto and yet another from Iquitos. McKenna et al. 1984

cielo ayahuasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

cielo-huasca : One of three varieties of ayahuasca recognized by Yumbos and Aldamas in eastern Ecuador: (For seeing heaven and the good protector spirits)

cipó: Ayahuasca drink known by the UdV in Brazil. (Generic term for forest vines.) Henman 1986

cipo caapi: Name used for ayahuasca by the Tikuna. Luna 1986b

cipó de prata: Common name in Brazil for Banisteriopsis anisandra (Adr. Jussieu) B.Gates, comb. nov. and Banisteriopsis gardneriana (Adr. Jussieu) Anderson & Gates. Gates 1982 Neither has been reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation.

cipó de rego: Common name in Brazil for Banisteriopsis pubipetala (Adr. Jussieu) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982 Not reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation.

cipó preto: Common name in Brazil for Banisteriopsis pubipetala (Adr. Jussieu) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982 Not reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation..

cipó de São Jõao: Common name in Brazil (Rio Grande do Norte) for Banisteriopsis lutea (Grisebach) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982

cofa: Name used for ayahuasca by the Kofán. Luna 1986b

crista de gallo: Common name in Brazil for Banisteriopsis gardneriana (Adr. Jussieu) Anderson & Gates and Banisteriopsis pubipetala (Adr. Jussieu) Cuatrecasas. Gates 1982 Neither reported to be used in ayahuasca preparation.

crude yajé: See yajé crudo

cuchi-ayahuasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

cuchi rao: A common name (Shipibo) given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

Daime: "Doctrine of Santo Daime". A major ayahuasca based religion. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

daime: The drink as known by the Santo Daime. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

daime: A common name given for ayahuasca. Rätsch 1998. (Name used by the Santo Daime)

Daimistas: Members of Santo Daime faith. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

dapa: Name for ayahuasca used by the Noanamá living on the Pacific slope. Luna 1986b
Given as dapá in Rätsch 1998.

djunglehuasca: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

djungle tea: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

doctor: A common name given for the drink ayahuasca and for the plant B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

droga (La Droga): A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

dschungel-ambrosia: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

embriaguez: Word meaning drunkenness or rapture. Williams 1987.

e-pe-pee-yoo-wee: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Colombia among the Yukuna) for Banisteriopsis martiniana var. subenervia [The first, second and fourth e have an inflection mark above them which are not in my available fonts.]

fiery yajé: See guarí-hakí-ma

fish caapi: See vaí-gahpi.

fish yajé: A type of yajé reserved for use by Tukano shamans who use it to contact the Master of the Animals. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

flesh yajé: A type of yajé reserved for use by Karapana shamans who use it to contact the Master of the Animals. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

Force (The Force; La Fuerza): Banisteriopsis caapi vine (Masculine half of the UdV sacrament) Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

Fuerza (La Fuerza: The Force): Banisteriopsis caapi vine (Masculine half of the UdV sacrament) Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

gahpí-da-vaí: ("yajé-branch-fish") A kind of yajé used by the Pira-Tupaya (Fish People). Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

gahpí gohóri: Yajé images, also used as decorations, by the Tukano. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1975

gahpí soró: The yajé pot (Tukano) Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

game animal head yagé: See wai-buku-lihoa-ma.

gata-kami-yai-yajé: "yajé de jaguar del río" "river jaguar yaje". Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986.

guaraná-rana macho: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for Banisteriopsis lucida (Apparently not reported to be used in ayahuasca.)

guarí-hakí-ma: "yajé fiero" "fiery yajé" A yaje known by Barasana of the rio Piraparaná. Name said to refer to the response of the user. Schultes 1986a

hamu-weko-yajé: "yajé de armadillo" Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & LAngdon 1986.

hananeroca: Name for ayahuasca used among the Campa. Signifies "parra del río de la juventud celestial" Luna 1986b

hapataino' : A kind of ayahuasca that transforms people into a boa. Banisteriopsis caapi as known by the Andoques in Colombia. Schultes 1985.

haya huasca: An alternate spelling given for a poorly defined form of the drug.

hayawasca: See comments under ayawasca.

head yajé: `Class' of yajé with stems of a dark hazel color, full of nodes and protrubences; collected almost flush withthe ground. One of three classes of yajé recognized by Tukano on the Pira-Paraná. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972.

he-kahi-ma : ("jurupary yagé) Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing material submitted as vouchers; from Hugh-Jones.

heron-foot vine: See yehé-ñoxkã-dá.

hi(d)-yati(d)yahé: an unidentified ayahuasca plant or additive reportedly used by the Karihonas (Hianákoto-Umáua) of the headwaters of the Apaporis . Schultes 1957 Name used for B. caapi by Karijonas of the Rio Apaporis. Schultes 1986a

hoasca: Brew prepared by an authorized UdV representative using B. caapi [and/or B. inebrians?] stems and P. viridis [or P. alba] leaves. Ott 1994
Name for drink used at Loreto, Peru. Luna 1986b
A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998. Name for tea used by UdV Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

honi: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

ho-ree-a-mee-see: Name used for Tetrapteris styloptera [Tetrapteris methystica] by Colombian Makuna. Schultes 1975a

horo yahé: "flower Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Secoya (Ecuador). Reported as a variety but may just refer to flowering stage. [Did not collect specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

huánto: Name said to be used for ayahuasca in northwestern Brazil. Costa 1956 citing Reinberg 1921. Also used in Ecuador for Brugmansia sp. [Solanaceae]. See admixture common name list..

huillca bejuco: Name given in Peruvian herbarium voucher of Banisteria leiocarpa. Von Reis Altschul 1975. Vilca, wilka, huilca and huillca are common names for the snuff yielding Anadenanthera; bejuco means vine. See Anadenanthera word list. Common name used for Banisteriopsis lutea [= B. nitrosiodora (Griseb.) O'Don. & Lour.] Gates 1982

iáhi: See admixture common name list.

iáhi': A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

Inga vine: See mere-oe-kaxpi-dá.

Inga yagé, the vine that came inside the jurupary instrument called `old star': See nyoko-buku-guda-hubea-ma.

iñotaino': A kind of ayahuasca that transforms people into a jaguar. (Banisteriopsis caapi as known by the Andoques in Colombia) Schultes 1985

itsutek: Makú name for a class of caapi (not positively identified) [Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná] Schultes 1986a

iyona: Name used for ayahuasca by the Záparo. Luna 1986b [Given as iyaona in Rätsch 1998.]

jaguar yaje: See yai-yajé

jagube: Banisteriopsis caapi vine as known by the Santo Daime. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

jagubi: Name used for ayahuasca in the community "Luz Universal" Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil. Luna 1986b

jahí: A plant Lewin mentioned as having its leaves and bark used for preparation of a drink. Schultes 1986

jauma: Name used for ayahuasca by the native people of Guaraní origin living along the central Amazon. Luna 1986b

jono pase: An Ese'eja name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Desmarchelier et al. 1996

jurupary yagé: See he-kahi-ma.

kaapi: A common name given for ayahuasca (the drink and the plant) in Rätsch 1998.

kaapistrauch: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

kadanytaino': A kind of ayahuasca that transforms people into a hawk. (Banisteriopsis caapi as known by the Andoques in Colombia) Schultes 1985)

kaheé: The drink as brewed by the Taiwano and Kabuyarí of the Rio Kananarí in Amazonian Colombia who cultivate two kinds of Banisteriopsis for this purpose. Schultes 1957 Yaje as known by the Yebasama (Tucanos). They recognize 6 classes Schultes 1986a
A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

kaheé del chaman: One who can use this has capacity to be a shaman. Used for divination. Very dangerous intoxicant. Not identified; possibly D. cabrerana but uncertain. 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a

kaheé-riama: The most potent type. Prepared with the bark and leaves of a small shrub. 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a

kahí: Yekwana name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Schultes 1986. Yecuana name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

kahi ida: Name used for ayahuasca by the Makuna. Luna 1986b

kahi-ukó: ("yageé catalyst") Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing material submitted as vouchers; from Hugh-Jones. Material was probably D. cabrerana.
"Caapi del agua" See in admixture common name list.

kahpi: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

kalí: Two `species' of vines of uncertain identity used by the Yekwanas of the upper Orinoco basin in Venezuela. Both were called kalí but only one was cultivated. Koch-Grünberg thought they were B. caapi. Schultes 1957 and Schultes 1986a.

kamalampi: "ayahuasca" Prepared by Piro of Rio Urubamba, Perú from B. caapi and an unidentified chacruna called horowa. (DMT was not detected.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

kamarampi: Machiguenga name for Banisteriopsis caapi & drink Russo et al. 1996-1997. Matsigenka name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Meaning "vomiting medicine" Shepard 1998kamárampi: Name for ayahuasca used among the Campa. The root word kamarank means to vomit. Luna 1986b
A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

ka' maranpi: (kama' ranpi) Name for ayahuasca used among the Matsigenka. See also entry for kamárampi. Luna 1986b

kapi: Name used among Yebasama. Thought to refer to ayahuasca but the source was unclear exactly what plant(s) was employed. Luna 1986b

keh-kapi: (keh = `pez') Makú name for a class of caapi (no positive ID) Used only by shamans in serious cases of illness. [Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná] Schultes 1986a

knotty yajé: See korepida.

kodo-yajé: Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

korepida: ("knotty yajé") `Class' of yajé recognized by the Desana who consider it traditionally to be `theirs'. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

kulikapio: Name used among Yebasama. Thought to refer to ayahuasca but the source was unclear exactly what plant(s) was employed. Luna 1986b

kumua-basere: "caapi para el chaminismo". A variety of caapi recognized by the Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná. Schultes 1986a

kumua-basere-kahi-ma: ("yagé for shamanizing") Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing material submitted as vouchers; from Hugh-Jones.

kupí: Makú name for a class of caapi (not positively identified) [Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño] Schultes 1986a

kúri-kaxpi-dá: (a noded vine giving the strongest caapi drink) Unidentified vine, the bark of which was indicated by Brüzzi as used for a caapi source among the Tukano of the Brazilian Rio Vaupés. (Schultes thinks it probable it represents growth stages of B. caapi; It has been suggested to possibly represent Gnetum nodiflorum or G. Leyboldii ) Schultes 1972a cited Brüzzi 1962.

kuurikë: Type of yajé with knotted stems used by Desana in Colombia . Reichel-Dolmatoff 1975kwa?ku: See kwaku (Langdon 1986)

kwaku: "Cocidas" `Cooked' One of two general Siona categories of yaje (as opposed to `crude') Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

mabude hi: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in British Guiana) for Banisteriopsis martiniana var. martiniana (This variety has evidently not been reported in ayahuasca?)

macaw yajé: See weko-yajé

Madre de la Soga: "Mother of the Rope" An Ese'eja name for the woman's spirit they associate with the ayahuasca plant. Desmarchelier et al. 1996

mammalia yajé : `Class' of yajé with stems of a hazel color with light spots, smooth surfaces; collected around 2 meters. One of three classes of yajé recognized by Tukano on the Pira-Paraná. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

mão de onça: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for B. caapi [or synonym].

maridi: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

mariri: Banisteriopsis caapi vine (Masculine half of the UdV sacrament) Callaway et al. 1999 and Shulgin & Shulgin 1997. Also the word used for magic melodies (icaros) that have words. Vasquez 2000

masha: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

méné-cají-má: Second most potent type. Visions of `culebras verdes'. Can see future events. Can kill the user if they are not sufficiently strong. (Thought to correspond to B. caapi.) 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a Deltgen 1978-1979. See nyoko-buku-guda-hubea-ma and also me-ne-ka-heé-ma in admixture common name list.

mere-oe-kaxpi-dá: (inga vine) Unidentified vine, the bark of which was indicated by Brüzzi as used for a caapi source among the Tukano of the Brazilian Rio Vaupés. (Schultes thinks it probable that it represents a growth stage of B. caapi) Schultes 1972a cited Brüzzi 1962.

merepida: ("yajé of guamo" (Inga sp.) `Class' of yajé recognized by the Desana who consider it traditionally `theirs'. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

metí: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

mihi: Name used by the Kubeo for B. caapi. (no plants were seen for identification) Schultes 1957. Name used for ayahuasca by the Aucas in Ecuador. Luna 1986b. Cubeo word for an source plant (thought to allude to B. caapi). Schultes 1986a

mii: Name used for ayahuasca by the Aucas in Ecuador. Luna 1986b. Aucas (Huaranis) name for ayahuasca . Witoto and Waorani name for a `variety' of ayahuasca. Weaker than B. caapi. Ott 1994 cited Davis & Yost 1983. Waorani name for Banisteriopsis muricata. Schultes 1986 and Davis & Yost 1983a

moca jene: A common name (Shipibo) given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

monkey-tail vine : See sêi-pixkoro-dá.

muchípu-gahpí-dá: ("sun caapi") An unidentified "leafy vine with small leaves" constricted in middle; used by Tukano of the Colombian Rio Vaupes as a kind of caapi. Schultes 1972 cited personal correspondence from Reichel-Dolmatoff.

muka dau: A common name (Cashinahua) given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

muku yaska: Unidentified ayahuasca plant. Rätsch 1998.

mune-yék: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Venezuela by the Arekuna) for Banisteria lucida (Apparently not reported to be used in ayahuasca.)

muruci : Name applied to Lophanthera pendula by Brazilians along upper Rio Negro. Schultes 1983

nai pae: Ayahuasca drink as known by Cashinahua of Rio Curamja. Ott 1994. See also nai kawa in the admixture common name list.

nape: Name used for ayahuasca by the Chocó in Colombia and Cayapas and Colorados of coastal Ecuador. Luna 1986b

naso ãnya yahé: "wooly monkey snake Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). "Leaf has yellow stripes." Vickers & Plowman 1984

naso yahé: "wooly monkey Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). "Leaf has yellow stripes." [Shushufindi]/ "Leaves at apex of vine have yellow splotches" [Río Eno] Vickers & Plowman 1984

natém: Name used by Jivaro (Shuar) for B. caapi and the drink. (cultivate) Pinkley 1969 citing Friedberg 1965. Also Luna 1986b

natema: Name used by the Jívaro (Shuar) of the Rio Pastaza and the Rio Bobonaza (eastern Ecuador) Schultes 1957 (and Schultes 1986a and Luna 1986b). Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Ecuador) for B. caapi [or synonym]. [Also as natemá in Rätsch 1998]

natja: Name signifying `mother's milk'. Applied to ayahuasca by Piro in Peru. Luna 1986b

nea yahé: "black Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). Name is said to refer to the dark color of the vine. [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

nepe: Name used for ayahuasca by the Chocó in Colombia and Cayapas and Colorados of coastal Ecuador. Luna 1986b. Colorado name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Schultes 1986a. Also Schultes 1957. Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Ecuador) for B. caapi [or synonym].

nepi: (nepe) Colorado (Ecuador) name for ayahuasca and B. caapi. Schultes 1957. Name used for ayahuasca by the Chocó in Colombia and Cayapas and Colorados of coastal Ecuador. Luna 1986b

nichi cubin: A common name (Shipibo) given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

nishi: Name used for ayahuasca by the Shipibo of the Río Ucayali. Luna 1986b
A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

nishi sheati: A common name (Shipibo) given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

nixi honi: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

nixi pae: (Vine drunkenness) A Banisteriopsis sp. used by the Cashinahua of eastern Peru and Western Brazil. Der Marderosian et al. 1969. Name means "embriaguez de la parra." Luna 1986b
Given as nixi paé in Rätsch 1998.

njaxe: Name for ayahuasca by the Coto. Luna 1986b

nö-ña'-mee-koo-ma: Name used for Tetrapteris styloptera [Tetrapteris methystica] by Colombian Makuna. Schultes 1975a

notema: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

ñuc-ña-wasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis martiniana var. subenervia

oafa: Name for ayahuasca by the Kofán. Luna 1986b

oasca: The ayahuasca drink as known by the UdV in Brazil. Henman 1986

oco-yajé: ("water yajé") B. longialata is known by this name. Schultes 1957 See also this entry in admixture common name list for more equivalencies.

ohoasca: A common name given for ayahuasca in Rätsch 1998.

ondi: Sharanhua name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

oni xuma: Name used for ayahuasca by the Amahuaca.. Luna 1986b

oo'-na'oo: Banisteriopsis caapi as known by the Witoto in Colombia (on Rio Caquetá in the Comisaría del Amazonas). They do not drink it but rather smoke the leaves. Schultes 1985

oo-fá : Name used for Banisteriopsis inebrians by the Kofán of Rio Sucumbíos in Amazonian Colombia who cultivate the plant. Schultes 1957

pahpi: Makú name for a class of caapi (not positively identified) [Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná] Schultes 1986a

panga huasca: Kofán (in eastern Ecuador) name for ayahuasca (plant and potion) when used to locate boars for hunting.

parra: Word meaning grapevine or earthen jug. Williams 1987.

parra contenida en el instrumento juruparí conocido como `estrella antigua': See nyoko-buku-guda-hubea-ma

parra contenida en la jejiga natatoria del pez juruparí: See wai-buhua-guda-hubea-ma

pastora: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in El Salvador) for Banisteriopsis muricata

pildé: A corruption of the Cayapa word pinde. A name used among the Colorados and Cayapas of the ecuatorial coast. Also used by the Emberá and the black population of the Pacific slope in Colombia and Ecuador. Luna 1986b

pindé: Name for ayahuasca used by the Cayapa (coastal Ecuador) . Schultes 1957 Cayapa name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Schultes 1986. A name used among the Colorados and Cayapas of the ecuatorial coast. Also used by the Emberá and the black population of the Pacific slope in Colombia and Ecuador. Luna 1986b.

pitujiracu: Ayahuasca name used by Mestizos; near Iquitos according to Plutarco Naranjo. Luna 1986b

pragua: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for Banisteriopsis adenopoda (Not reported in ayahuasca)

pucahuasca: Name used for a Peruvian ayahuasca cultivar grown near Pilluana by R. Huallaga. McKenna et al. 1984

purga (La purga): Ayahuasca brew. Luna 1984b. A name used in Peru for the drink. Luna 1986b

purgueros: Healing specialists (Peruvian mestizos) who use ayahuasca for performing shamanic functions. Luna 1984b.

purga-huasca: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

purga-huasca de los perros: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. \caapi [or synonym].

ramanujú: Name used for ayahuasca by the Yaguas in Peru. Luna 1986b

rambi: Name used by the Sharanahua for the vine and the drink. Rivier & Lindgren 1972 Also encountered `rampi'. Name for ayahuasca used by speakers of the Pano language, Rio Pano, Peru. Luna 1986b

rami: Preferred word for ayahuasca used by Culina (a borrowed word: from Pano) See tsipu. Rivier & Lindgren 1972. Name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

rami appane: Culina name for B. caapi. Reported and vouched by Rivier and Rüff. Pinkley 1969. Also a name for a Psychotria sp. See entry under admixture common name list.

rami wetseni: Culina name for B. caapi. Reported and vouched by Rivier and Rüff. Pinkley 1969.

rao: A common name given for the drink ayahuasca and the plant B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.
[A generic Shipibo term for medicinal plants.]

red ground jaguar: See suari-tukuro-kahi-ma.

red jaguar yagé: See yaiya-suava-kahi-ma.

reé-ma: Name applied by the Colombian Makuna to B. caapi the plant, when it is used on its own. Schultes 1957

Remedio (El remedio) : A Sibundoy term for the drink prepared from B. caapi. (derived from Spanish) Bristol 1966

remedy of caapi: See cají-somomá

river jaguar yajé: See gata-kami-yai-yajé

rope of the dead: An Ese'eja name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Desmarchelier et al. 1996

rumi ayahuasca: Name used for a Peruvian ayahuasca cultivar grown near Iquitos. It tested stronger than Cielo ayahuasca also grown in the area. McKenna et al. 1984

sacawáska: A Sibundoy term for B. caapi and the drink prepared from it. (derived from Quichua) Bristol 1966 ["c" has v-shaped diacritical mark over it.]

sacha-ayahuasca : ("wild ayahuasca") Witoto and Waorani name for a `variety' of ayahuasca. Ott 1994 cited Davis & Yost 1983. Used as substitute for B. caapi by Witoto of Peruvian Amazon (considered to be stronger than B. caapi). Schultes 1986 Witoto name for Banisteriopsis muricata (Pucu Urquillo on the Rio Ampiyacu in Peru.) Said to be active but weaker than Banisteriopsis caapi. Davis & Yost 1983a

sachahuasca: A common name given for ayahuasca (drink and plant) in Rätsch 1998.

sandurco-huasca: One of three varieties of ayahuasca recognized by Yumbos and Aldamas in eastern Ecuador: (For seeing the totemic mountains and their spirits)

Santo Dai-me: Name used for ayahuasca at Colonia 5.000, Rio Branco, Acre, Brazil. Luna 1986b

Santo Daime: The ayahuasca drink as known by the UdV in Brazil. Henman 1986

Santo Daime: "Doctrine of Santo Daime". A major ayahuasca based religion. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

sarcelo: Name used in Tocache for Banisteriopsis muricata Cav. [Malpighiaceae] Duke & Vasquez Martinez 1993

sarcello: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for Banisteriopsis muricata

sêi-pixkoro-dá : (monkey-tail vine) Unidentified vine, the bark of which was indicated by Brüzzi as used for a caapi source among the Tukano of the Brazilian Rio Vaupés. (Schultes thinks it probable it represents growth stages of B. caapi) Schultes 1972a cited Brüzzi 1962.

seelenliane: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

seelenranke: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

sesé yahé: "white-lipped peccary Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984 [First "e" in sesé has ~ over it.]

shori: Yaminahua name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

shuri: The most common name used for the vine and the drink by the Sharanahua. Three kinds are recognized [based on color of drink not plant]: Black: Shuri fisopa; Red: Shuri oshinipa; White: Shuri oshopa. Rivier & Lindgren 1972. Reported and vouched by Rivier and Rüff. Pinkley 1969. Vouchers for black and red were both identified as B. caapi. Name for ayahuasca used by speakers of the Pano language, Rio Pano, Peru. Luna 1986b

shuri: "ayahuasca" Prepared by Sharanahua of Marcos, Perú. Components not specified. (DMT was detected in the drink: 14 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 7.1 mg per 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

shuri fisopa: ("tukondi") "Black ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú from B. caapi, a Psychotria sp. and Lygodium venustum (DMT was detected in the drink: 9.8 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 18 mg per 100 ml. THH at 9.8 mg per 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972. A name used in Peru for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b.

shuri-fisopa: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Peru) for B. caapi [or synonym].

shuri oshinipa : "Red ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú from B. caapi, a Psychotria sp. and Lygodium venustum (DMT was detected in the drink: 16 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 19 mg per 100 ml. THH at 7.2 mg/ 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

sia sewi yahé: "egg sewiBanisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). Leaves are said to be yellowish. [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

sipo: Yecuana name for ayahuasca (a general name used for vining plants) Luna 1986b [See also cipó]

sisé yahé: "siBanisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

snake yajé: A type of yajé known by the Barasana of the Pira-Paraná but said to no longer occur in their area. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

soga (La soga) : An Ese'eja name for Banisteriopsis caapi. Desmarchelier et al. 1996.
Word meaning rope or cord or a sly fellow. Local library information and Williams 1987. Also hangman's rope. Phrases containing this word often have negative associations. Austin Public Library Information 1998.

sombra de tora: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Argentina) for Banisteriopsis muricata

spirit yajé: See wati-yajé

suari-tukuro-kahi-ma: ("red ground jaguar") Used during fruit blowing ceremonies. One sees red when under its influence. Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing vouchers from Hugh-Jones.

sun caapi: See muchípu-gahpí-dá.

tara yahé: "bone Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). Vine is knobby and said "hard like a bone" Vickers & Plowman 1984 See tara in Anadenanthera and admixture common names & word lists,.also under entry for Caesalpinia.

tee-mee-a-mee-see-ma: Name used for Tetrapteris silvatica by Colombian Makuna. Schultes 1975a Not reported in ayahuasca but closely related to T. styloptera.

timbó branco: Name used on Rio Tapajos for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

tiwaco-mariri : Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil) for B. caapi [or synonym]. Name used in Brazil for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

tonchin-huasca: one of three varieties of ayahuasca recognized by Yumbos and Aldamas in eastern Ecuador: (To remove magic darts causing diseases)

totenliane: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

totorinmo: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (by the Uaica-Mucajai in Brazil) for Banisteriopsis lucida (Apparently not reported to be used in ayahuasca.)

totsha cuyo: Name for ayahuasca used by the Peruvian Piro. Said to signify "agüita de la soga". Luna 1986b

tsipu: Name for ayahuasca used by Culina Three kinds are recognized: Tsipu tsueni (Black), Tsipu wetseni (Red) and Tsipu makuni (White) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tsipu makuni: "White ayahuasca" Prepared by the Culina of Zapote, Perú from B. caapi and P. viridis. (DMT was detected: 13 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 17 mg per 100 ml; THH at 7.2 mg/ 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tsipu tsueni "dsati" : "Crude black ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú (0.10.68) from B. caapi, a Psychotria sp. and Lygodium venustum (DMT was not detected.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tsipu tsueni "dsati": "Crude black ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú (13.10.68) from B. caapi, and a Psychotria sp. (DMT was not detected.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tsipu tsueni "pekanani": "Boiled black ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú from B. caapi, a Psychotria sp. and Lygodium venustum (DMT was detected in the drink: 12 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 18 mg per 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tsipu tsueni "pekanani": "Boiled black ayahuasca" Prepared by Culina of Zapote, Perú from B. caapi, a and a Psychotria sp. (DMT was detected in the drink: 5.4 mg per 100 ml. Harmine present at 6.6 mg per 100 ml.) Rivier & Lindgren 1972

tucondi: (tukondi) Marinahua name for ayahuasca. [Upper Purus River, Peru] Luna 1986b

tukondi: See also shuri fisopa.

tukunaca: Smoother form of Banisteriopsis vine found in cooler areas of southern Brazil. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

UdV: União do Vegetal. "Union of the Plant" A major ayahuasca based religion. Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

uipa: Guajibo name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

undi : Name applied to the vine and the drink by the Sharanahua. Rivier & Lindgren 1972. Name for ayahuasca used by speakers of the Pano language, Rio Pano, Peru. Luna 1986b

uní: Conibo ayahuasca name. Luna 1986b

vaí-gahpi : ("fish caapi") An unidentified "leafy vine with small flowers" said to resemble coffee leaves [Ed.: Some Psychotria spp. are said to be vines]; with thin smooth bark; used by Tukano of the Colombian Rio Vaupes as a kind of caapi. Schultes 1972 cited personal correspondence from Reichel-Dolmatoff.

vegetal: União do Vegetal (Brazil) name for ayahuasca drink. Henman 1986, Luna 1986b & Shulgin & Shulgin 1997

wahi: "Crudo" `Crude' One of two general categories of yaje as divided by the Siona (as opposed to `cooked') Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

wai-buhua-guda-hubea-ma: ("The yagé that came inside the jurupary `fish swim bladder'. " "la parra contenida en la jejiga natatoria del pez juruparí". ) Used during dance house ceremony. One sees people when under its influence. Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing vouchers from Hugh-Jones. A variety of caapi recognized by the Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná. Schultes 1986a.

wai-buku-lihoa-ma : ( "caapi de cabeza de animal de caza". "game animal head yagé") Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a cited vouchers; from Hugh-Jones. A variety of caapi recognized by the Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño. Schultes 1986a

wa'í yahé: "meat Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). "Leaf is green" Vickers & Plowman 1984

wampi: Name used by Matsigenka and Piro for a type of ayahuasca associated with a very strong wind. Luna 1986b

wampu: Name used by Matsigenka and Piro for a type of ayahuasca associated with a very strong wind. Luna 1986b

waska: Quechua word meaning a cord, rope, vine, climbing plant, grapevine and, interestingly, an earthen jug (such as is traditional for ayahuasca) Luna 1986b See also parra.

water yajé: See yajé agua

wati-yajé: "yajé de espíritu" "spirit yaje". Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986.

wea yahé: "maize Banisteriopsis" The `maize' colored brew that results from boiling and straining B. caapi and D. cabrerana. (Siona-Secoya) Vickers & Plowman 1984

weé-po-awk: Name used for Tetrapteris styloptera [Tetrapteris methystica] by Colombian Tanimuka on the Rio Miritiparaná. Schultes 1975a and 1983.

weko-yajé: "yajé de guacamayo" "macaw yaje" Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

weki yahé: "tapir Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). "tapir" is said to refer to the large size it attains. [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984 ["e" in weki has ~ over it.]

wenanduri-guda-hubea-ma: (wenan-duri-guda-hubea-ma) ("la caapi contenida en la instrumento juruparí" "The yagé that came inside the jurupary instrument called wenanduri") Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing vouchers from Hugh-Jones. A variety of caapi recognized by the Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná. Schultes 1986a

whamtsen: Makú name for a class of caapi (not positively identified) [Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná] Schultes 1986a .

wild ayahuasca: sacha-ayahuasca.

wild pig yajé: See yajé de cerdo salvajo

wititi: Type of yage obtained from Wititi people. Langdon 1986

yaco-ayahuasco: See under admixture common name list.

yagé, yagê, yahe, yajé : Most commonly used for B. caapi and B. inebrians. Name for B. caapi and drink used by the Cashinahua of eastern Peru and Western Brazil. They prepare it from the stem of B. caapi with the leaves and young shoots of branches of B. rusbyana. [Intending to refer to D. cabrerana] Der Marderosian et al. 1969. Name reportedly used by the Karihonas (Hianákoto-Umáua) of the headwaters of the Apaporis thought to refer to B. caapi (no plants were seen for the identification) Schultes 1957 Name used in Colombia. Rivier & Lindgren 1972 and Schultes 1957 Ingano of the Putumayo in Colombia call the drink yajé as do the Kofán. Yajé was reported (by Rocha in 1905) as used by the Inga and Siona of the headwaters of the Rios Caquetá and Putumayo in Colombia. Correguahe of Rio Caquetá in southern Colombia called it yajé. Herbarium collections of Banisteriopsis inebrians from Mocoa in Amazonian Colombia were annotated with this name. Schultes 1957 Name used by Desana in Colombia Reichel-Dolmatoff 1975 Secoya name for ayahuasca . Ayahuasca name used by Tucano, Kofán, Siona, Ingano, and Hianakota-Umana. Luna 1986b

yagé: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Brazil and Colombia) for B. caapi [or synonym]. Common name given on herbarium vouchers of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966

yagé: Bora name for Banisteriopsis elegans (Triana & Planch.) Sandwith. [Malpighiaceae] (leaves used for oral sores in children) Name occasionally applied to Banisteriopsis longialata (Ndz.) B.Gates (said to sometimes be used) Duke & Vasquez M. 1993

yagé: See also admixture common name list.

yagé cultivado: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

yagé del monte: Used by the Ingano of the Putumayo in Colombia for Banisteriopsis inebrians. Inguanos call the drink yajé as do the Kofán. Schultes 1957. Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. inebrians Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo: Umbría, Colombia. Bristol 1966. Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Colombia) for B. caapi [or synonym].

yageé catalyst : See kahi-ukó.

yagé for shamanizing : See kumua-basere-kahi-ma.

yagé sembrado: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Colombia) for B. caapi [or synonym].

yagé that came inside the jurupary `fish swim bladder' : See wai-huhua-guda-hubea-ma.

yagé that came inside the jurupary instrument called wenanduri : See wenanduri-guda-hubea-ma.

yageúco: See admixture common name list.

yági: See admixture common name list.

yahé: A plant Lewin mentioned as having its leaves and bark used for preparation of a drink. Name used for B. caapi by Karijonas of the Rio Apaporis. Schultes 1986a

yahé'okó: See admixture common name list.

yahé kwakoki: "Banisteriopsis house" Ceremonial hut. (Siona-Secoya) Vickers & Plowman 1984

yahé repa: "Banisteriopsis proper" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). Vickers & Plowman 1984

yahé wi'e: "Banisteriopsis cooks" The assistants who help the shaman prepare yahé. (Siona-Secoya) Vickers & Plowman 1984

yahi : Tukano word for "sorcerer" or "sorcerer's plant". Bristol 1966

yahi: Siona name for the Moraceous Pseudolmoedia laevis (R. & P.) Macbride. Vickers & Plowman 1984 Not reported in ayahuasca.

yahi: Siona word to refer to sweet potatos (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) Vickers & Plowman 1984. Not reported in ayahuasca.

yaí yahé: "jaguar Banisteriopsis" A type of Banisteriopsis (thought to probably be B. caapi) recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). [Did not collect a specimen.] Vickers & Plowman 1984

yai-yajé: "yajé de jaguar" "Jaguar yaje" Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986.

yaíya-suána-cají-má: "Caapi of the red jaguar" Causes red visions. Lacks the power to kill its user. (Thought to correspond to B. caapi.) 1 of 6 classes of cají recognized by the Yebasama (Tucanos) of the Rio Paraparaná in the Colombian Vaupés. Schultes 1986a cited Deltgen 1978-1979.

yaiya-suava-kahi-ma : ("caapi de jaguar rojo" "red jaguar yagé") Used during fruit blowing ceremonies. One sees red when under its influence. Name used for a `variety' of yagé recognized by the Barasana of Rio Piraparaná in Colombian Comisaria del Vaupés. (Sterile material identified as B. inebrians.) Schultes 1972a citing vouchers from Hugh-Jones. A variety of caapi recognized by the Barasana-Makú on the Rio Castaño, an affluent of the Rio Piraparaná. Schultes 1986a

yaja: Guanano name for ayahuasca. Luna 1986b

yaje: Name given on herbarium voucher of Calliandra calothyris [sic] (C. calothyrsus) from Guatemala. Von Reis Altschul 1975

yaje: Name given on herbarium voucher of Leucana guatemalensis from Guatemala. Von Reis Altschul 1975

yáje: Name given to a source plant used by Secoya in Ecuador. (native and cultivated) Pinkley 1969.

yáje: Kofán Name for drink and a source plant in Ecuador. (source plant not cultivated) Pinkley 1969.

yajé: Common name given on herbarium voucher of B. caapi (Spruce ex Griseb.) Mort. collected in the Comisaría del Putumayo, Colombia. Bristol 1966 Karijona word for an ayahuasca source plant; thought to allude to B.caapi. Schultes 1986a Ayahuasca name used by Tucanos, Kofán, Siona, Inganos, and Hianakota-Umana. Luna 1986b

yajé: Banisteriopsis Martiniana (Juss.) Cuatrecasas var. laevis Cuatrecasas as known by the Makuna of the middle Apaporis. Schultes 1975a cited García-Barriga 1975

yajé: See also admixture common name list.

yajé: Tetrapteris mucronata as known by Karaparana of Río Apaporis in Colombia. Schultes 1975a. Drink prepared from this species. Schultes 1986

yajé agua: See also admixture common name list.

yajé-branch-fish: See

gahpí-da-vaí.

yajé carne: Class of caapi (B. caapi) known by the Siona in Comisaría Colombiana del Putumayo. (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé crudo: "Crude yajé"A class of caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi) known by the Siona in Comisaría Colombiana del Putumayo. (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé datura: Class of caapi (B. caapi) known by the Siona in Comisaría Colombiana del Putumayo. (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé de armadillo: See hamu-weko-yajé

yajé de cabeza: See as head yajé.

yajé de cerdo salvajo: "wild pig yajé" A class of caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi) known by the Siona in Comisaría Colombiana del Putumayo (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé de espíritu: See wati-yajé

yajé de guacamayo: See weko-yajé

yajé de guamo: See yajé of guamo

yajé de jaguar del río: See gata-kami-yai-yajé

yajé de jaguar: See yai-yajé

yajé de mamífero: See mammalia yajé.

yajé de mono negro lanoso: See aso-yajé

yajé de pajarito: See admixture common name list.

yajé de pájaro canastero: yajé of a bright blue bird with a nest that looks like a basket Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé de pájaro: See bi'-a'-yajé

yajé de pez gato negro: See zi-simi-yajé

yajé fiero: See guarí-hakí-ma

yajén: Hardenberg's name for ayahuasca (Colombia)
A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

yajé of blood: One of three types used by the Barasana of the Pira-Paraná. Visions said to be in red. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé of duhtú-puu-sereda : `Class' of yajé recognized by the Desana who consider it `theirs' traditionally. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé of guamo: `Class' of yajé with stems of a light hazel color, surfaces somewhat fluted; collected around 3 meters. One of three classes of yajé recognized by Tukano on the Pira-Paraná. See also merepida. One of three types used by the Barasana of the Pira-Paraná. Said to produce visions referring to ceremonial songs. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé of the jungle animals: A type of yajé recognized by the Barasana of the Pira-Paraná. Said to produce predominately red and blue visuals. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé of the red jaguar: One of three types used by the Barasana of the Pira-Paraná. Said to give yellow visions and to be used to become familiar with the general effects. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé of tooka: `Class' of yajé recognized by the Desana who consider it `theirs' traditionally. Reichel-Dolmatoff 1972

yajé Pléyades: A class of caapi (B. caapi? identity unclear due to a damaged specimen) known by the Siona in Comisaría Colombiana del Putumayo. (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986

yajé tapir: Class of caapi (Banisteriopsis caapi) known by Siona in Colombian Putumayo. (1 of 18) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986.

yaji: A common name given for B. caapi (or synonym) in Rätsch 1998.

ya'wi yahé: "collared peccary Banisteriopsis" A type of B. caapi recognized by the Siona (Ecuador). "Leaf has yellow stripes." [Shushufindi]/ "Leaves at apex of vine have yellow splotches" [Río Eno] Vickers & Plowman 1984

yaxé: A Sibundoy term (derived from Tukano) for B. caapi and drink prepared from it. Bristol 1966

yehé-ñoxkã-dá: (heron-foot vine) Unidentified vine, the bark of which was indicated by Brüzzi as used for a caapi source among the Tukano of the Brazilian Rio Vaupés. (Schultes thinks it probable that it represents growth stages of B. caapi) Schultes 1972a cited Brüzzi 1962.

yukuna: Name given by Gates 1982 as a local name (in Venezuela) for Banisteriopsis martiniana var. martiniana (Not reported in ayahuasca?)

zi-simi-yajé: "yajé de pez gato negro" "black cat-fish yaje". Unidentified `narcotic' plant. (1 of 18 classes of yaje recognized by the Siona) Schultes 1986a & Langdon 1986