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2000 U.S. Election
Results of Drug Related Ballot Measures

There were a number of drug-related ballot measures voted on in various states on November 7, 2000. Below is a quick summary of the measures and their results.


Alaska
Proposition 5 - failed, would have legalized cannabis for nearly all non-commercial uses. Would also have released anyone previously jailed for offenses reversed by this proposition and would have looked into the feasibility of paying restitution to those released. It appears they asked for too much. [More Info]


California
Proposition 36 - passed, making first (and many second) time drug possession punishable only by treatment, rather than imprisonment. The conviction is then automatically removed from the person's record (for most purposes) upon completion of the treatment program.

Measure G (mendocino county) - passed, decriminalizing possession and cultivation of up to 25 mature female cannabis plants for personal, medical, or recreational purposes. [More Info]


Colorado
Amendment 20 - passed, making it legal for chronically ill patients, who have written certification from a doctor, to possess and use cannabis. Would also set up a state registry of patients who have written doctor certification. [More Info]


Massachusetts
Question 8 - failed, would have mandated state provided treatment for first and second time drug offenders, paying for the treatment with the fines and properties confiscated through forfeiture laws. Forfeiture laws would have been revised to increase the level of proof required before property is seized. [Results]


Nevada
Question 9 - passed, amends the Nevada constitution to allow for the medical use of Cannabis upon the advice of a doctor. A confidential patient registry will be developed as well as "would authorizing appropriate methods of supply to authorized patients". Requires parental consent for minors. [Results]


Oregon
Measure 3 - passed, property forfeiture reform law now requires conviction before police are allowed to confiscate property. [Results]


Utah
Initiative B - passed, reforms the asset forfeiture laws, increasing protection for third party individuals who's property is used in committing a crime. Seized property will now be turned over to the state treasurers office, property owners will get state-paid attorneys to represent them in their fight to recover the property, and proceeds of seized property sales will go into the Uniform School Fund rather than to police. [More Info]