Erowid
 
 
Plants - Drugs Mind - Spirit Freedom - Law Arts - Culture Library  
Horizons: Perspectives on Psychedelics - Oct 5-7
An event in New York City that examines the role of psychedelic drugs
and plant medicines in science, medicine, culture and spirituality.
cover image
Shooting Up
A Short History of Drugs and War
Rating :
rating
Author(s) :
Lukasz Kamienski
Pages :
381
Pub Date :
2016
Edition(s) at Erowid :
2016(hb,f/f)
Publisher :
Oxford University Press
ISBN :
9780190263478
"This in-depth analysis of the 'highs' of war tells a largely untold story--of the role drugs played over the centuries in suporting troops on the battlefield, and the role they will play in future in driving the course of war. Kamienski's book will undoubtedly come to be regarded as a classic text."
-- Christopher Coker, Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics

BLURBS #
"In Shooting Up: A Short History of Drugs and War, Lukasz Kamienski provides a diligent examination, keen view, and detailed discussion of the implications of the long standing, and often controversial use of drugs in military operations. Shooting Up is a most interesting read that makes an excellent contribution to the literature."
-- Prof. James Giordano, Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center

"If you think you understand the nature of armed conflict you'd better think again. This book shows how warfighters since ancient times have used narcotics to prepare for, endure, and live with fear and violence. A stunning new look at the way wars are fought."
-- Jonathan Moreno, David and Lyn Silfen University Professor of Ethics, University of Pennsylvania

"Traditional military histories make only passing references to soldiers' use of alcohol and various drugs. Kamienski, however, provides us with a very non-traditional and fascinating overview of the panoply of drug use in wartime. From providing 'Dutch courage' to soldiers, to actually serving as a casus belli, drugs have shaped the very nature of war itself. Shooting Up highlights the pervasiveness of drug use in war, giving us an entirely new perspective on this important dimension of the human, operational, and diplomatic history of combat."
-- Prof. James Giordano, Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center