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cover image
Hallucinogens and Culture
Rating :
rating
Author(s) :
Peter T. Furst
Pages :
173
Pub Date :
1976
Edition(s) at Erowid :
1997(pb,1st ed,8th pr,f-)
Publisher :
Chandler & Sharp Publishers
ISBN :
0883165171
REVIEWS, EXCERPTS, & COMMENTS #
BACK COVER #
This book is an introduction to some of the hallucinogenic drugs in their cultural and historical context, stressing their important role in religion, ritual, magic and curing.

BLURBS #
"Furst's important work on hallucinogens in different cultures will be of interest to botanitsts, pharmacologists, physicians, anthropologists, psychologists, and all those concerned with these fascinating drugs and man's relationship to them. It shows us something of the positive side of hallucinogens in a magical and religious context and might help us come to terms with these substances in our own society."
-- Andrew T. Weil, M.D., Botanical Museum of Harvard University, and author of The Natural Mind

"Dr. Furst demonstrates with a wealth of cross-cultural and historical data and some of his own first-hand experiences the often decisive role hallucinogens have sometimes played, and continue to play, in the maintenance of social systems in the traditional world, and their positive role in rituals of religion or initiation, mythology and symbolism, and in art, as well as in psychotherapy and curing of physical ills. I strongly recommend this book to every reader interested in our heritage and in human behavior in general...."
-- Norman E. Zinberg, M.D., Harvard University and the Drug Abuse Council

"Modern readers have for some time needed a comprehensive survey of Amerindian plant hallucinogens, both cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary, to take account of archaeology, symbolism and art, as well as of botany and ethnography. Dr. Furst has now performed this service, in a book notable both for its breadth of anthroplogical learning and its readability."
-- Dr. Weston La Barre, Duke University

ABOUT THE AUTHOR(S) / EDITOR(S) #
Peter T. Furst has been a Professor of Anthropology at the State University of New York at Albany, and a Research Associate at the Botanical Museum of Harvard University.