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Entheogen Ethics

"The only freedom which counts is the freedom to do what some other people think to be wrong.
There is no point in demanding freedom to do that which all will applaud.
All the so-called liberties or rights are things which have to be asserted against others
who claim that if such things are to be allowed their own rights are infringed or their own liberties threatened.
This is always true, even when we speak of the freedom to worship, of the right of free speech
or association, or of public assembly. If we are to allow freedoms at all
there will constantly be complaints that either the liberty itself or the way in which it is exercised
is being abused, and, if it is a genuine freedom, these complaints will often be justified.
There is no way of having a free society in which there is not abuse.
Abuse is the very hallmark of liberty."

-- Former Lord Chief Justice Hailsham

Erowid supports freedom of religion and spiritual practices. There are currently many religions and groups that use visionary substances as a primary part of their spiritual practices. Only one practice, the Native American Church's use of peyote, is exempted from current laws against "drug use". The Constitution guarantees every citizen's right to practice their beliefs without interference from the government.

Erowid strongly believes in only the responsible and ethical use of entheogens. Though many visionary substances have been outlawed by the U.S. government, and legislative attempts have even been made to make discussion of entheogens a crime, it is important that information about these substances be available to everyone.

Entheogens can be a meaningful part of the mindful search for a healthier and more spiritual existence.

Plants & Drugs
The Entheogen Vaults
The Spiritual Use of Entheogens

Individual Code of Conduct for Primary Religious Practices


When I engage in spiritual practices designed to bring about profound changes in consciousness,
I will consider my intentions and will choose carefully the occasion and location for the practice.
I will be well informed about the mental and physical effects, anticipate reasonably foreseeable
risks to myself and others, and employ safeguards to minimize these risks.

Safeguards may include:
  • Ensuring that my setting is reasonably free of hazards.
  • Ensuring that I will not operate automobiles or other potentially dangerous machinery.
  • Taking myself `off duty' from responsibilities.
  • Arranging for someone to be `on duty' (a `guide' or `sitter')
    to keep the session safe and respond appropriately to any exigencies that might arise.