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In article  manderso@uxa.cso.uiuc.edu (anderson mark david) writes:

Speaking of LSD, here is some interesting information from the new 3rd
edition of the Psychedelics Encyclopedia, by Peter Stafford, which I 
happened to spot on the new book shelf here at UCR's library.

"LSD is a very curious chemical.  When given by injection, it disappears
rapidly from the blood.  It can be observed when tagged with carbon 14
in all the tissues, particularly the liver, spleen, kidneys and adrenal
glands.  The concentration found in the brain is lower than in any other
organ - being only about 0.01 percent of the administered dose.  Sidney
Cohen, in The Beyond Within, has estimated that an average dose results
in only some 3,700,000 molecules of LSD (about 2/100ths of a microgram
crossing the blood-brain barrier..."  (Does this sound reasonable?)

"The Army engaged in covert "field operations" overseas.  A notorious
example is the torture of James Thornwell, a black American soldier in
France, who was suspected of having stolen classified documents in 1961.
We will probably never know the full story on at least nine others,
refered to as "foreign nationals," whoe were subjected to the Army's LSD
interrogation project, "Operation THIRD CHANCE."

Thornwell, then twenty-two, was first exposed to extreme stress, which
included beatings, solitary confinement, denial of water, food and
sanitary facilities and steady verbal abuse.  After six weeks, he was
given LSD without his knowledge.  The interrogators threatened 
"to extend [his shattered] state indefinitely," according to an Army
document dug up later, "even to a permanent condition of insanity."  In
the late 1970s, Thornwell sued the US governmnent for $10 million; the
US House of Representatives approved a compromise settlement of $650,000
in 1980."