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n-Butyl Alcohol Material Safety Data Sheet
 Common Name:    n-Butyl Alcohol 
 CAS Number:     71-36-3 
 DOT Number:     UN 1120 
 Date:           February, 1989 






 HAZARD SUMMARY 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol can affect you when breathed in and can also 
      rapidly pass through your skin. 
 *    Exposure can cause eye irritation and headaches. Irritation of 
      the nose and throat may also occur. Higher levels may cause 
      you to become dizzy and lightheaded and to pass out. 
 *    Exposure can damage the liver, kidneys, hearing and the sense 
      of balance. 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol is a FLAMMABLE LIQUID and a FIRE HAZARD. 
 
 IDENTIFICATION 
 n-Butyl Alcohol is a colorless liquid with a strong odor. It is 
 used as a solvent for fats, waxes, shellac, resins, gums, and 
 varnish. 
 
 REASON FOR CITATION 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol is on the Hazardous Substance List because it 
      is regulated by OSHA and cited by ACGIH, NFPA, DOT and EPA. 
 *    This chemical is also on the Special Health Hazard Substance 
      List because it is FLAMMABLE. 
 *    Definitions are attached. 
 
 HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOU ARE BEING EXPOSED 
 *    Exposure to hazardous substances should be routinely 
      evaluated. This may include collecting air samples. Under OSHA 
      1910.20, you have a legal right to obtain copies of sampling 
      results from your employer. If you think you are experiencing 
      any work related health problems, see a doctor trained to 
      recognize occupational diseases. Take this Fact Sheet with 
      you. 
 *    ODOR THRESHOLD = 0.1 ppm. 
 *    The odor threshold only serves as a warning of exposure. Not 
      smelling it does not mean you are not being exposed. 
 
 WORKPLACE EXPOSURE LIMITS 
 OSHA:     The legal airborne permissible exposure limit (PEL) is 50 
           ppm not to be exceeded at any time. 
 ACGIH:    The recommended airborne exposure limit is 50 ppm which 
           should not be exceeded at any time. 
 
 *    The above exposure limits are for air levels only. When skin 
      contact also occurs, you may be overexposed, even though air 
      levels are less than the limits listed above. 
 
 WAYS OF REDUCING EXPOSURE 
 *    Where possible, enclose operations and use local exhaust 
      ventilation at the site of chemical release. If local exhaust 
      ventilation or enclosure is not used, respirators should be 
      worn. 
 *    Wear protective work clothing. 
 *    Wash thoroughly immediately after exposure to n-Butyl Alcohol 
      and at the end of the workshift. 
 *    Post hazard and warning information in the work area. In 
      addition, as part of an ongoing education and training effort, 
      communicate all information on the health and safety hazards 
      of n-Butyl Alcohol to potentially exposed workers. 
 
 This Fact Sheet is a summary source of information of all potential 
 and most severe health hazards that may result from exposure. 
 Duration of exposure, concentration of the substance and other 
 factors will affect your susceptibility to any of the potential 
 effects described below.  
 ------------------------------------------ 
 
 HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION 
 
 Acute Health Effects 
 The following acute (short term) health effects may occur 
 immediately or shortly after exposure to n-Butyl Alcohol: 
 
 *    Contact can irritate the skin, causing a rash or burning 
      feeling. 
 *    Exposure can cause headaches and irritate the eyes. It can 
      also irritate the nose and throat. Higher levels may cause you 
      to become dizzy, lightheaded and to pass out. 
 
 Chronic Health Effects 
 The following chronic (long term) health effects can occur at some 
 time after exposure to n-Butyl Alcohol and can last for months or 
 years: 
 
 Cancer Hazard 
 *    According to the information presently available to the New 
      Jersey Department of Health, n-Butyl Alcohol has not been 
      tested for its ability to cause cancer in animals. 
 
 Reproductive Hazard 
 *    According to the information presently available to the New 
      Jersey Department of Health, n-Butyl Alcohol has not been 
      tested for its ability to adversely affect reproduction. 
 
 Other Long Term Effects 
 *    Repeated contact may cause drying and cracking of the skin. 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol can damage the hearing and sense of balance. 
 *    Exposure may damage the liver and kidneys. 
 
 MEDICAL 
 
 Medical Testing 
 For those with frequent or potentially high exposure (half the TLV 
 or greater, or significant skin contact), the following are 
 recommended before beginning work and at regular times after that: 
 
 *    Liver and kidney function tests. 
 *    Hearing test (audiogram) and test for balance. 
 
 Any evaluation should include a careful history of past and present 
 symptoms with an exam. Medical tests that look for damage already 
 done are not a substitute for controlling exposure. 
 
 Request copies of your medical testing. You have a legal right to 
 this information under OSHA 1910.20. 
 
 Mixed Exposures 
 Because more than light alcohol consumption can cause liver damage, 
 it may increase the liver damage caused by n-Butyl Alcohol. 
 
 WORKPLACE CONTROLS AND PRACTICES 
 
 Unless a less toxic chemical can be substituted for a hazardous 
 substance, ENGINEERING CONTROLS are the most effective way of 
 reducing exposure. The best protection is to enclose operations 
 and/or provide local exhaust ventilation at the site of chemical 
 release. Isolating operations can also reduce exposure. Using 
 respirators or protective equipment is less effective than the 
 controls mentioned above, but is sometimes necessary. 
 
 In evaluating the controls present in your workplace, consider: (1) 
 how hazardous the substance is, (2) how much of the substance is 
 released into the workplace and (3) whether harmful skin or eye 
 contact could occur. Special controls should be in place for highly 
 toxic chemicals or when significant skin, eye, or breathing 
 exposures are possible. 
 
 In addition, the following controls are recommended: 
 
 *    Where possible, automatically pump liquid n-Butyl Alcohol from 
      drums or other storage containers to process containers. 
      to make sure that an explosive concentration does not exist. 
 
 Good WORK PRACTICES can help to reduce hazardous exposures. The 
 following work practices are recommended: 
 
 *    Workers whose clothing has been contaminated by n-Butyl 
      Alcohol should change into clean clothing promptly. 
 *    Contaminated work clothes should be laundered by individuals 
      who have been informed of the hazards of exposure to n-Butyl 
      Alcohol. 
 *    On skin contact with n-Butyl Alcohol, immediately wash or 
      shower to remove the chemical. At the end of the work shift, 
      wash any areas of the body that may have contacted n-Butyl 
      Alcohol, whether or not known skin contact has occurred. 
 *    Do not eat, smoke, or drink where n-Butyl Alcohol is handled, 
      processed, or stored, since the chemical can be swallowed. 
      Wash hands carefully before eating or smoking. 
 
 PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 
 
 WORKPLACE CONTROLS ARE BETTER THAN PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT. 
 However, for some jobs (such as outside work, confined space entry, 
 jobs done only once in a while, or jobs done while workplace 
 controls are being installed), personal protective equipment may be 
 appropriate. 
 
 The following recommendations are only guidelines and may not apply 
 to every situation. 
 
 Clothing 
 *    Avoid skin contact with n-Butyl Alcohol. Wear solvent 
      resistant gloves and clothing. Safety equipment suppliers/ 
      manufacturers can provide recommendations on the most 
      protective glove/ clothing material for your operation. 
 *    All protective clothing (suits, gloves, footwear, headgear) 
      should be clean, available each day, and put on before work. 
 *    ACGIH recommends neoprene, nitrile, or polyvinyl chloride as 
      good to excellent protective materials. 
 
 
 Eye Protection 
 *    Wear splash proof chemical goggles and face shield when 
      working with liquid n-Butyl Alcohol, unless full facepiece 
      respiratory protection is worn. 
 
 Respiratory Protection 
 IMPROPER USE OF RESPIRATORS IS DANGEROUS. Such equipment should 
 only be used if the employer has a written program that takes into 
 account workplace conditions, requirements for worker training, 
 respirator fit testing and medical exams, as described in OSHA 
 1910.134. 
 
 *    Where the potential exists for exposures over 50 ppm, use a 
      MSHA/NIOSH approved full facepiece respirator with an organic 
      vapor cartridge/canister. Increased protection is obtained 
      from full facepiece powered air purifying respirators. 
 *    If while wearing a filter, cartridge or canister respirator, 
      you can smell, taste, or otherwise detect n-Butyl Alcohol, or 
      in the case of a full facepiece respirator you experience eye 
      irritation, leave the area immediately. Check to make sure the 
      respirator to face seal is still good. If it is, replace the 
      filter, cartridge, or canister. If the seal is no longer good, 
      you may need a new respirator. 
 *    Be sure to consider all potential exposures in your workplace. 
      You may need a combination of filters, prefilters, cartridges, 
      or canisters, to protect against different forms of a chemical 
      (such as vapor and mist) or against a mixture of chemicals. 
 *    Where the potential for high exposures exists, use a 
      MSHA/NIOSH approved supplied air respirator with a full 
      facepiece operated in the positive pressure mode or with a 
      full facepiece, hood, or helmet in the continuous flow mode. 
 *    Exposure to 8,000 ppm is immediately dangerous to life and 
      health. If the possibility of exposures above 8,000 ppm 
      exists, use a MSHA/NIOSH approved self contained breathing 
      apparatus with a full facepiece operated in continuous flow or 
      other positive pressure mode. 
 HANDLING AND STORAGE 
 
 *    Prior to working with n-Butyl Alcohol you should be trained on 
      its proper handling and storage. 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol is not compatible with ACID ANHYDRIDES, ACID 
      CHLORIDES, OXIDIZERS (such as PERCHLORATES, PEROXIDES, 
      PERMANGANATES, CHLORATES and NITRATES), REDUCING AGENTS, 
      COPPER and COPPER ALLOYS. 
 *    Store in tightly closed containers in a cool, well ventilated 
      area away from HEAT. 
 *    Sources of ignition such as smoking and open flames are 
      prohibited where n-Butyl Alcohol is used, handled, or stored 
      in a manner that could create a potential fire or explosion 
      hazard. 
 *    Metal containers used in the transfer of 5 gallons or more of 
      n-Butyl Alcohol should be grounded and bonded. Drums must be 
      equipped with self closing valves, pressure vacuum bungs, and 
      flame arresters. 
 *    Use only non sparking tools and equipment, especially when 
      opening and closing containers of n-Butyl Alcohol. 
 
 Common Name:   n-Butyl Alcohol 
 DOT Number:    UN 1120 
 DOT Emergency Guide code: 26 
 CAS Number:    71-36-3 
 ---------------------------------------- 
 Hazard rating         NFPA 
 FLAMMABILITY            3 
 REACTIVITY              0 
 ----------------------------------------  
 POISONOUS GASES ARE PRODUCED IN FIRE 
 ---------------------------------------- 
 Hazard Rating Key: 0=minimal; 1=slight; 2=moderate; 3=serious; 
 4=severe 
 
 FIRE HAZARDS 
 
 *    n-Butyl Alcohol is a FLAMMABLE LIQUID. 
 *    Use dry chemical, CO2, or alcohol foam extinguishers or water 
      to keep fire exposed containers cool 
 *    POISONOUS GASES ARE PRODUCED IN FIRE. 
 *    If employees are expected to fight fires, they must be trained 
      and equipped as stated in OSHA 1910.156. 
 
 SPILLS AND EMERGENCIES 
 
 If n-Butyl Alcohol is spilled or leaked, take the following steps: 
 
 *    Restrict persons not wearing protective equipment from area of 
      spill or leak until cleanup is complete. 
 *    Remove all ignition sources. 
 *    Ventilate area of spill or leak. 
 *    Absorb liquids in vermiculite, dry sand, earth, or a similar 
      material and deposit in sealed containers. 
 *    Keep n-Butyl Alcohol out of a confined space, such as a sewer, 
      because of the possibility of an explosion, unless the sewer 
      is designed to prevent the build up of explosive 
      concentrations. 
 *    It may be necessary to contain and dispose of n-Butyl Alcohol 
      as a HAZARDOUS WASTE. Contact your Department of Environmental 
      Protection (DEP) or your regional office of the federal 
      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for specific 
      recommendations. 
 
 ========================================== 
 FOR LARGE SPILLS AND FIRES immediately call your fire department. 
 ========================================== 
 
 FIRST AID 
 
 POISON INFORMATION 
 
 Eye Contact 
 *    Immediately flush with large amounts of water for at least 15 
      minutes, occasionally lifting upper and lower lids. 
 
 Skin Contact 
 *    Quickly remove contaminated clothing. Immediately wash area 
      with large amounts of water. 
 
 Breathing 
 *    Remove the person from exposure. 
 *    Begin rescue breathing if breathing has stopped and CPR if 
      heart action has stopped. 
 *    Transfer promptly to a medical facility. 
 
 PHYSICAL DATA 
 
 Vapor Pressure:     4.2 mmhg at 68oF (20oC) 
 Flash Point:           84oF (28.9oC) 
 Water Solubility:   Soluble 
 
 OTHER COMMONLY USED NAMES 
 
 Chemical Name: 
 1-Butanol 
 
 Other Names and Formulations: 
 n-Butanol; Propylcarbinol. 
 ------------------------------------------  
 Not intended to be copied and sold for commercial purposes. 
 ------------------------------------------  
 NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
 Right to Know Program 
 CN 368, Trenton, NJ 08625 0368 
 ------------------------------------------ 
 ------------------------------------------ 
 
 ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION 
 
 n-Butyl Alcohol is a clear, colorless liquid.  It is used in the 
 coatings industry for the production of lacquers and latexes, as an 
 intermediate in the manufacture of certain plastics, as a solvent 
 for oils, drugs, and perfumes, as an ingredient in perfumes and 
 flavors, and in formulating automobile brake fluids.  It may enter 
 the environment from industrial or municipal waste treatment plant 
 discharges, or spills. 
 
 ACUTE (SHORT-TERM) ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS 
 
 Acute toxic effects may include the death of animals, birds, or 
 fish, and death or low growth rate in plants.  Acute effects are 
 seen two to four days after animals or plants come in contact with 
 a toxic chemical substance. 
 
 n-Butyl Alcohol has slight acute toxicity to aquatic life and 
 birds.  It has caused various adverse effects in agricultural and 
 ornamental crops.  Insufficient data are available to evaluate or 
 predict the short-term effects of n-Butyl Alcohol to land animals. 
 
 CHRONIC (LONG-TERM) ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS 
 
 Chronic toxic effects may include shortened lifespan, reproductive 
 problems, lower fertility, and changes in appearance or behavior.  
 Chronic effects can be seen long after first exposure(s) to a toxic 
 chemical. 
 
 n-Butyl Alcohol has slight chronic toxicity to aquatic life.  
 Insufficient data are available to evaluate or predict the long- 
 term effects of n-Butyl Alcohol to plants, birds, or land animals. 
 
 WATER SOLUBILITY 
 
 n-Butyl Alcohol is highly soluble in water.  Concentrations of 
 1,000 milligrams and more will mix with a liter of water. 
 
 DISTRIBUTION AND PERSISTENCE IN THE ENVIRONMENT 
 
 n-Butyl Alcohol is slightly persistent in water, with a half-life 
 of between 2 to 20 days.  The half-life of a pollutant is the 
 amount of time it takes for one-half of the chemical to be 
 degraded.  About 76.5% of n-Butyl Alcohol will eventually end up in  
 water; the rest will end up in the air. 
 
 BIOACCUMULATION IN AQUATIC ORGANISMS 
 
 Some substances increase in concentration, or bioaccumulate, in 
 living organisms as they breathe contaminated air, drink 
 contaminated water, or eat contaminated food.  These chemicals can 
 become concentrated in the tissues and internal organs of animals 
 and humans. 
 
 The concentration of n-Butyl Alcohol found in fish tissues is 
 expected to be about the same as the average concentration of n- 
 Butyl Alcohol in the water from which the fish was taken. 
 
 SUPPORT DOCUMENT:   AQUIRE Database, ERL-Duluth, U.S. EPA, 
                     Phytotox.