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Recent Reviews
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Psilocybin Mushroom Handbook: Easy Indoor & Outdoor Cultivation
by L.G. Nicholas and Kerry Ogamé
Publisher:
Quick American 
Year:
2006 
Reviewed by FunGal
6/18/2009

An excellent resource for those interested in indoor and outdoor psychoactive mushroom cultivation; it appears to be the most elaborate and thorough text on the subject since Psilocybin: Magic Mushroom Grower’s Guide, written by Oss and Oeric. [...] complements the methods described by Oss and Oeric, and includes overviews on more recent methods, including the PF Tek and outdoor cultivation approaches for Psilocybe species not even known to exist three decades ago. [ read more ]

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Sage Spirit: Salvia Divinorum and the Entheogenic Experience
by Martin W. Ball
Publisher:
Kyandara Publishing 
Year:
2007 
Reviewed by David Arnson
5/28/2009

Ball has definitely covered previously unwritten ground in his discussion of Salvia divinorum. This is a significant contribution, which helps flesh out Terence McKenna’s oft-repeated urgings for us all to “map out hyperspace.” With all the easy talk of entheogenic shamanism this past decade or so, Ball steps up to the plate and provides concrete examples and structures to work with. [ read more ]

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Peopled Darkness: Perceptual Transformation through Salvia divinorum
by J.D. Arthur
Publisher:
iUniverse 
Year:
2008 
Reviewed by David Aardvark
5/27/2009

The author wisely chose to focus Peopled Darkness entirely on his own first-person experiences with the plant, and the philosophical questions that those experiences raised. While many people try any given drug once or twice, and can write up spectacular trip reports or even hit the lecture circuit as “experts,” relating riveting tales of their limited encounters, it is much more difficult to take the time to develop a long-term relationship with a single plant ally, like Arthur has done with Salvia divinorum. [ read more ]

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Leary on Drugs: New Material from the Archives! Advice, Humor and Wisdom from the Godfather of Psychedelia
by Hassan I. Sirius (Editor)
Publisher:
RE/Search 
Year:
2008 
Reviewed by Seth R. Glick
4/29/2009

The novice and experienced alike will be wowed by Leary’s articulation of the mental and physical sensations of his drug trips. A good collection of writings for anyone with even a fleeting interest in Leary or psychedelics. The majority of writings from the 1960s are presented within the context of the psychedelic movement and the new people and drugs that threatened to upset the status quo in America. Similarly, those writings from the 1990s focus on technology’s role in the future. [ read more ]

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Metamorphosis: 50 Contemporary Surreal, Fantastic and Visionary Artists
by Robyn Flemming (Ed.)
Publisher:
BeinArt Publishing 
Year:
2007 
Reviewed by David Arnson
4/14/2009

The quality of the art in Metamorphosis is absolutely breathtaking. Herein you will not find any fractal, computer, or totally abstract art; what binds this collection together is an emphasis on a classic approach. The editors have struck an excellent balance between light and dark themes, as well as drawing from a truly international pool of creative souls. The images are so varied and intense that I found it impossible to absorb the book in one sitting. [ read more ]

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Tales of a Shaman's Apprentice: An Ethnobotanist Searches for New Medicines in the Amazon Rain Forest
by Mark J. Plotkin
Publisher:
Penguin Books 
Year:
1994 
Reviewed by David Arnson
3/24/2009

Mark Plotkin, who now runs an Amazonian preservation organization, delivers a fascinating story about his travels to the jungles of South America in search of medicinal plants. ...So elegantly detailed and well-written that even 16 years after its initial publication, it is still a must-read for anyone remotely interested in plant-based shamanism, or even for those just looking for a great book about life and adventure in the jungle.
read more ]

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Damanhur: Temples of Humankind
by Esperide Ananas (Silvia Buffagni)
Publisher:
CoSM Press 
Year:
2006 
Reviewed by Jon Hanna
3/12/2009

Exploring this book is a delight, with jewel-like bursts of color surprising the viewer down every passageway and excavated chamber. Like ineffable experiences of the Godhead, so too the impact of the art and architecture that make up the Temples of Humankind can not be adequately expressed in the words of any review. Quite simply, Damanhur: Temples of Humankind belongs in every entheoart lover’s library. [ read more ]

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Anadenanthera: Visionary Plant of Ancient South America
by Constantino Manuel Torres & David Repke
Publisher:
Haworth Herbal Press 
Year:
2006 
Reviewed by Jon Hanna
2/16/2009

[A]n exhaustive overview detailing the botany, geography, history, mythology, archeology, chemistry, and pharmacology of this widely used entheogen. ...The book is considerably enhanced by 59 high quality black & white plates, 41 of which contain photographs. Many of the remaining plates are attractive pen-and-ink drawings by Donna Torres. ...All in all, this is as solid a reference book as I can possibly imagine, and one which should grace the shelves of every entheophile’s library. [ read more ]

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Intoxication
by Ronald K. Siegel
Publisher:
Pocket Books 
Year:
1990 
Reviewed by Seth R. Glick
1/31/2009

Free of any political or medical pretense, Siegel deftly covers the past, present and future of drugs. Moreover, he rarely reveals his roots in academia by drowning the reader with overwrought or technical language. His anecdotes are insightful, if occasionally suspicious, but help make Intoxication a snappy and informative read. [ read more ]

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The Butterfly Hunter
by Klea McKenna
Publisher:
Klea McKenna 
Year:
2008 
Reviewed by Erik Davis
12/11/2008

Klea grew up in the swirling penumbra of Terence’s peculiar shadow, and, like many children of famous and colorful folk, had to consciously define her own creative voice apart from her father’s world. In its first, gallery iteration, The Butterfly Hunter did not mention her father’s name, because she wanted the work to stand on its own merit. It is a mark of her courage that her book takes on Terence’s legacy, and a mark of her success that she does it with such candor and care. [ read more ]

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