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Reviews by Lux
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Chemical Warfare: Secrets Almost Forgotten
by James S. Ketchum, MD
Publisher:
James S. Ketchum, MD 
Year:
2006 
Reviewed by Lux
4/29/2007

In addition to providing an important window into the formerly-classified world of US chemical weapons research, Chemical Warfare is a valuable source of information on a plethora of psychoactive compounds, including BZ (QNB), LSD, THC, scopolamine, and atropine. Technical information included in a long Appendix will greatly interest the specialist, particularly toxicologists and pharmacologists. [ read more ]

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The Search for the Manchurian Candidate
by John Marks
Publisher:
W. W. Norton 
Year:
1991 (first edition: 1979) 
Reviewed by Lux
4/2/2007

Journalist John Marks filed a Freedom of Information Act suit against the CIA and received seven boxes of documents pertaining to MKULTRA. The destruction of these records had been ordered by CIA head Richard Helms and MKULTRA director Sidney Gottlieb in 1972, but they were spared through a clerical error. Marks reviewed the heavily-redacted material and supplemented his research with extensive interviews of numerous key figures. The results of his investigation are documented in this book. [ read more ]

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A Scanner Darkly
by Philip K. Dick
Publisher:
Vintage Books 
Year:
1977 
Reviewed by Lux
2/13/2007

In this novel, every important image becomes its own opposite. At the center of the circle, like the ringleader of symbols, is the drug. What is Substance D? We are never told of its effects. I imagine it to be something like a mix of ketamine and methamphetamine. We are told that there are two kinds of people: those who are addicted to Substance D, and those who haven’t tried it. [ read more ]

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The Road to Eleusis
by R. Gordon Wasson, Albert Hofmann, Carl A.P. Ruck
Publisher:
William Daly Rare Books 
Year:
1998 
Reviewed by Lux
2/13/2007

The Road to Eleusis is an entertaining and engaging read. It argues well, but not convincingly. We do not know for certain if hallucinogens were employed in the rites of Eleusis, much less if said hallucinogens were derived from ergot. The authors have made brilliant and sometimes strong arguments on behalf of their theory, but ultimately, and ironically, the conviction that Ruck and Wasson exude persuades the reader against their thesis, for it appears that in this matter there can be no certainty.
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